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Angel L. Reyes, III
Angel L. Reyes, III
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Toy Rattles And Play Sets Recalled Due To Choking Hazard

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P. Graham Dunn, in cooperation with the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), announced a voluntary recall of Wooden Toy Rattles, due to a choking hazard to young children.

The hazard is caused by the wooden dowels being installed at an angle, which allows the metal rattle inside to become exposed. While there have been no reports of injury, to date, the company is aware of four incidents in which the metal rattle did become exposed posing a safety risk.

The recall involves circular wooden toy rattles [see photos] sold at book retailers and gift stores nationwide from June through July 2010.

Consumers are advised to take the recalled rattles away from children and to contact P. Graham Dunn for a refund. For more information call 800) 828-5260 or visit their Web site at www.pgrahamdunn.com.

Little People Play ‘n Go Campsite

In a separate recall, Fisher-Price voluntarily recalled Little People Play ‘n Go Campsite play sets in the U.S. and Canada, also due to a choking hazard.

The recalled seven-piece plastic play set contains a character named Sonya Lee [see photo], who can break and expose small parts that could pose a choking hazard to children.

To date, the company has received eight reports of the toy figure breaking but no injuries.

The recall involves Little People Play ‘n Go Campsite toy sets with product number R6935. No other Sonya Lee figures or play sets are involved in the recall.

Consumers should take the recalled toy figures away from children and contact Fisher-Price for a replacement. For more information call Fisher-Price at (800) 432-5437 or visit www.service.mattel.com.

Choking Related Deaths

There are more than 100 visits to the emergency room, for every choking-related death, according to the CDC. In 2001, more than 17,500 children 14 or younger were treated in the ER for choking episodes.